Top Five Writing Tips

I definitely don’t claim to be an expert on the subject, since I still haven’t published my first novel, but here are five things that I believe every new writer should know.

1. Read

images (2)I know that everybody says this but I think it is the most important thing for every writer to know and do. How can you expect yourself to be a good writer if you’re not a good reader first? But I don’t just mean sit there and read a book, though that is fun I’ll admit, what I actually mean is that you need to read the novel from a writer’s perspective.

Go back and read a book that you’ve already read, this will stop the storyline from getting in the way. Pull apart the novel, think like the author, why did they write the character doing this or thinking that, what purpose did it have in the story. Observe how minor characters effect the storyline as opposed to secondary characters. If you learn to understand the intentions of a particular author, you can learn how to apply the technique to your own work, though I won’t lie it will take time. Then you will never be able to fully enjoy a novel again.

2. Make Time and Space

images1A lot of people have a life outside writing. Mostly because it is nearly impossible to make a day job out of writing, unless you’re the next J.K Rowling. Set aside a certain amount of time, either every day or even every week, where all you do is work on your project. By getting into that routine you will discipline your mind to be creative when you want it to be, this will help you to write on demand, not just when you’re mind decides to throw you a bone.

You also need to make the space. An office, the bedroom, your local cafe. A place that will allow you to focus on nothing else. Those with children would find this more difficult. For this I recommend talking to your partner about your writing and agreeing on a time that they will take primary care of the children.

Pets are another distraction, as it is I had to lock my young feline out of the room in order to write this blog post, unfortunately he can open all the doors in the house so I have no escape unless I lock it, also unfortunately I then get the sulking meow from the other side of the door. Most furry friends can be locked out of the house so that you can gain some peace and quiet, others will be quite happy to leave you to it. It’s just the clingy ones you have to worry about, unfortunately I have one of those. Still trying to get him out of it.

3. Do Your Research

images2Different stories require different levels of research, your actual story and how much information you already know will affect the amount of research you need to do. You can do your research in one of two ways; as you need it or before you need it. Honestly I prefer option two. It means that I already have the knowledge when I require it. However that doesn’t always work, especially when your story takes a turn even you didn’t expect. This is where option one comes into play.

The main reason for this is so you know what you’re writing about. For example, you can’t write a novel based in the past and have a piece of technology that hasn’t been invented yet. Or. In regards to weapons, you can’t have particular type of weapon if they weren’t used in that geographical area during that time period. It’s all about the fact checking, and it prevents embarrassment later on if you ever get asked about it.

4. Don’t Copy Other Writers/Authors

bookshelfPretty much anybody would read that title and go of course, you can’t plagiarise, that’s illegal. But, I’m not talking about plagiarising. I’m talking about writing styles. Every writer has their own voice, it takes time but every writers finds their at some point. I will admit that I did this myself when I first started writing. But it never worked for me. Now I follow my own path as a writer, and my work is better for it.

It’s normal to look into how other writers plan, research and write their stories and try to mimic their process and get try to use it. Occasionally it will work. But usually it doesn’t or only part of it works for another writer. If you are going to study other authors’ writing processes I recommend trying several styles and use what is most comfortable.

Can you write better with everything planned or do you write better in the moment without forethought. My style is a bit of both, honestly it depends on what I’m writing. The Stray took a bit of planning, mostly because it was a first novel, The Lost, which has been written, was mostly spontaneous writing. I haven’t written the third book yet as I returned to begin the revision process for The Stray, however I know that the storyline I’ve chosen will take some planning, especially since I’m drawing the series to an end.

The only thing I can truly recommend in this area is to study. Explore writing techniques and use what works for you. Develop your own style and your own voice.

5. Don’t Expect Too Much

writing-a-short-biographyI can’t tell you how many times I finished a draft of The Stray then went back and to read over it nearly a month later and I was disappointed in it. I’ve forgotten how many versions of the story I’ve written, but this particular version is in its fourth draft and I have only changed the storyline in each.

I go back and read the first version of The Stray and I can barely get past the first page. I wrote it when I was twelve, and back then I thought it was the best thing in the world, I wanted to be the next Christopher Paolini, a published author as a teenager. Looking back I am seriously glad that I didn’t send it out to anybody.

I saw a meme on my Facebook feed a few weeks ago. It talked about first drafts, I can’t remember exactly what it said, and of course I am unable to find it when I want it, but it was something about how “we’re shoveling sand into a sand pit so we can build castles later” I believe that this is the best way to describe a first draft. It takes time to write a story and it doesn’t always work the first time you try. So take your time and keep writing.

– Amanda Geisler

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Published in: on October 8, 2017 at 5:24 am  Leave a Comment  
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What is Assisted Self-Publishing?

You have a story to tell. You have a publishing dream. You have a stapled stack of pages you’d like to see turned into a book. Everyone looking at this post is at a different point in their own creative journey, and some of you are aiming toward publication, like I was just a few years ago. Then, through a series of events that can only be considered fateful, I found Ouroborus Book Services, an assisted self-publisher. For me, this partnership was perfect, and now I get to sign my books at stores and call myself an author – the dream! But for those playing at home, tapping away at keys on your own first manuscript,  you’re certainly forgiven for asking: what is assisted self-publishing?Girl in spectacles studying in library

Assisted self-publishing is exactly what it sounds like: publishing by yourself, but with help. For the last century, the art and business of book publishing has been dominated by big publishing houses, whose expertise in guiding manuscripts from authors’ hands through the many processes of editing, proofreading, formatting, printing, binding, marketing and distributing has been unmatched. There was no way to get your book out there except to send your pages off to a commissioning editor and joining the slush pile, and if you were lucky enough that your book was ‘picked up’, all creative control was with the publisher, who in this model is, after all, the one shelling out the dollar bills for the project. And make no mistake, there are a lot of dollars to be paid, to all those talented and skilled people employed by the publishing house to handle the different tasks in the production chain to make massive print runs of quality product. Then, slowly, on the tides of numerous industry and social changes, self-publishing became viable again – self-funding writers taking a chance on themselves, teaching themselves the necessary skills and processes, taking advantage of technologies and platforms as they came available to get their works out into the world. Naturally, these early amateur efforts lacked the finesse and craftsmanship of traditionally published books, but the gap is fast closing, and today’s independent books can be indistinguishable from their big house competitors. Minimising print runs and cutting all those people out of the production chain lowers costs significantly, and many big authors either began their careers in self-publishing, or, as is emerging, are moving back to it for the creative control it lends and the complete financial independence. Because if you’re the one doing all the work and putting forward all the capital? You reap the profits.

Open flying old booksBut as you can imagine when you take on the work of a whole chain of professionals, self-publishing is a lot to do, a lot to learn and a heck of a lot to manage. As attractive an option as self-publishing is becoming, balancing the steep learning curve and administrative stuff with the author’s actual job of, you know, writing, is both off-putting and, at the very least, a big drain on your time.

That is the niche that assisted self-publishing is filling for thousands of authors. Maybe you want the creative control to choose your own cover but can’t design, don’t know any graphic artists and wouldn’t have the first clue how to format an image into a cover for book-printing software, or perhaps you’ve got a drawer of rejection letters and now you’re willing to take a chance on yourself where big publishers won’t. Assisted self-publishers either employ or network with freelancers to complete all those jobs in the chain, reducing some of the pressure from authors who can’t be expected to know all the processes in this whole industry.

images (2)Assisted self-publishing worked for me, but I’m a single case study, and I can’t speak for your circumstances. For me – an unpublished young female with a fantasy manuscript, probably the least attractive query publishers can possibly receive – it allowed me to circumvent the gatekeeping of traditional publishing that says “we’ve got enough of those”, “we’re not publishing in that genre at the moment” or “we don’t publish new authors, sorry.” It also enabled me to produce a quality, professional product that can compete with mainstream fiction, which was more important to me than simply “getting the work out there.” I certainly didn’t have the skills to do that on my own, so it made the most sense for me to hire some experts and work with them. If self-publishing is your chosen path and you’re feeling overwhelmed just wondering where to even start, assisted self-publishing may be for you.

As with all investments, do your research and shop around. A professional service should be able to be transparent with you about what they do and where the costs will arise. Go with your gut and your bank account, and DON’T RUSH – your book has waited this long to be born, it’ll keep another minute while you really crunch the facts and figures to decide what’s right for you.

 

by Shayla Morgansen

 

Published in: on August 27, 2017 at 4:02 am  Leave a Comment  
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Book vs Movie (TV edition) Under the Dome by Stephen King

Book vs Movie (TV edition)

Under the Dome by Stephen King

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Mostly spoiler free

Long time no see readers!  I thought I’d get us back in the swing of things by doing a book vs movie blog for you all of something that has been chewing away at my brain for the past five months. Now as some of you will know I am a big Stephen King fan. I’ve read almost every book and seen almost all the movies/tv series/mini series that have come from this mega writer and liked most of them. So when I heard they were going to be making his recent epic Under the Dome into a tv series I was rather excited by the news. It was one of the few books that I hadn’t got around to reading and therefore I set off reading as fast as I could. I demolished the 896 pages in a week the day before the tv show began.

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I was excited this was definitely the type of King writing that I loved – plots upon plots with a massive intertwining of characters, a veritable cast of hundreds, mixed with real life drama in a totally unreal situation. This will be perfect for tv! I said to myself with glee. It was a big enough book to easily get four or five seasons out of it and enough cliff hangers to make for awesome season closers.

I was so wrong. Now I know the King endorsed the series and approved the changes that were made. Don’t get me wrong, I’m okay with minor changes to translate to film media – it’s inevitable. Hey I loved The Lord of the Rings movies and they had MANY changes made for filming purposes (except for the exclusion of Tom Bombadil *shakes fist at Peter Jackson*) but the show that I turned on in June was not Under the Dome. Sure there was a dome (with very few characteristics shared) and the names of characters still popped up but even the main character, Barbie, who in the book is the ‘every man’ character that even though you don’t love him, you have to like him for trying his hardest, gets turned into a hit man who is a complete douche (no this is not a spoiler as its revealed in the first scene). There no one to love in the show and not even many characters left to like. The town select man Jim Rennie is a fluffy kitten in the show (albeit one with claws) than the total megalomaniac he is in the book.

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I fought it out for 9 episodes before giving up in exasperation. There was no trace of the book left to see. Every element that made it great was ripped out from under it.

I thought I’d ask a friend who hadn’t read it what they thought and they were just bored. The characters were bland to them and most of it made little sense (and not in a Lost style what the hell is going on because this is a mystery way) with none of the characters being believable.

 So if you want my opinion read the book. If you must watch the tv show, watch it first.

Book 8/10

Tv show 2/10

~Sabrina RG Raven